More Warriors News

Veteran swingman Devean George never made it to the Toronto Raptors, who acquired him from the Dallas Mavericks in early July in a four-team trade involving Shawn Marion.

So you can understand his immediate reaction when he heard he was being shipped to the Warriors three weeks later.

"Is this it?" he said, sharing his first thought with local media at the Warriors' downtown Oakland facility Wednesday.

Oddly enough, many Warriors fans have the same question. Not about George, but their squad, which they expected to undergo some major changes this offseason.

But early in August, the reality is the Warriors might be done with alterations. They certainly are unlikely to land the difference maker they've been after.

Rookie guard Stephen Curry, whom the Warriors are still salivating over, and George, acquired last week for guard Marco Belinelli, may have to suffice.

"I didn't come here to sit on the bench," George said after taking his physical. "I can make open shots. I'm good at figuring out my niche, how to get playing time. A lot of the little things I can bring to the table that coaches like."

Early in the offseason, new general manager Larry Riley said to expect changes. He said he wanted a point guard, beef on the front line and experience.

Then, the draft-day rumors of trading for Phoenix Suns All-Star forward Amare Stoudemire teased fans. But as the offseason progressed, and NBA players moved around, reality began to set in.


Advertisement

The players the Warriors want either aren't available or aren't willing to sign long term if Golden State acquires them.

That, or they aren't clearly better than second-year forward Anthony Randolph, who's entrenched as a cornerstone of the franchise. Or they aren't worth giving up center Andris Biedrins for.

With the Stoudemire trade nowhere near happening — according to multiple sources — the Warriors are left with few options.

It may not be the worst thing in the world, though. If this were the roster heading into the season, the Warriors would get a chance to play their young studs big minutes, getting them the experience they need.

Also, the Warriors might be setting themselves up to be players next offseason, when a wealth of talent is expected to be available. It isn't too far fetched to think the combination of free agents aplenty and rough economic times could land the Warriors a good player at a good price.

Sitting on $9 million in expiring contracts, with players who will be even more tradable next season, the Warriors just might be able to make a run at an All-Star who wound up with fewer options than anticipated.

Of course, if they add a big contract now, they probably wouldn't be able to take advantage of serendipity.

Keeping the current roster figures to mean another struggling season, even if the Warriors are better than last year's 27-55 squad. If this is it, perhaps the greatest hope is that the Warriors can scrap into contention for a playoff spot.