OAKLAND -- Brandon Rush has missed the entire season with a knee injury, and it took Andrew Bogut awhile to get going with ankle and back issues. But beyond that, the Warriors have been a remarkably durable team this season.

Eight Warriors have played in at least 70 of the team's 74 games, and coach Mark Jackson acknowledged on Monday that it's probably an overlooked factor in the team's drive toward an NBA playoff berth.

Klay Thompson and Draymond Green have played in all 74 games. Carl Landry and Harrison Barnes have played in 73, David Lee and Jarrett Jack 71, Stephen Curry and Festus Ezeli 70. The Warriors' three rookies -- Green, Barnes and Ezeli -- have missed only five games combined out of a possible 222, and of Ezeli's four DNPs, only one was because of injury.

The Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson (11) reacts to being called for a foul on a blocked shot against the Sacramento Kings in the first quarter
The Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson (11) reacts to being called for a foul on a blocked shot against the Sacramento Kings in the first quarter of their NBA game played at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, March 27, 2013. (Dan Honda/Staff) ( Dan Honda )

"It's important to be healthy, and the credit goes to my guys," Jackson said. "One thing they do, they stay in the gym, they take care of their bodies, they take pride in being in top-notch shape, and they stay ready. When you do those things, you put yourself in position to miss a minimum amount of games. We've been very fortunate."

Leading the way in the Warriors' iron man derby is Thompson. While he's not yet a threat to A.C. Green's NBA record of 1,192 consecutive games played or even active leader Russell Westbrook's 386 (Westbrook never has missed an NBA game), Thompson has played in 140 straight to start his pro career. He's tied for ninth on the active consecutive games list.

It's a point of pride for the second-year guard, who maintains he never missed a game in high school and just one at Washington State, that as a result of a suspension. The notion of not only playing but also starting all 82 games this year after being the only Warrior to play in all 66 games last season is not lost on him.

"It'd be huge, particularly in my second season," he said. "It's gotten me so much better to be able to fail, to be able to succeed ... you just learn more from your experiences when you're out there every game. Eighty-two straight starts would mean a lot, because it reflects the hard work I've put in."

It would also mark a stark contrast to his father, former Portland big man Mychal Thompson, who despite being a very durable player in the middle of his career, missed his entire second season after suffering a broken leg.

"That's funny ... well, maybe not so funny," said the younger Thompson. "But people don't realize how many games we play. It's a lot of basketball. It's taxing, but it's what we signed up for. You've got to love it if you're going to make it through 82, and I love it. I don't want to take one game off until I'm in my 30s."

Thompson is aware of some of the long NBA consecutive game streaks put together by such current players as Andre Miller and Jason Kidd and former ones such as Randy Smith and Reggie Miller.

Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant (24) tries to drive around Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson during the second quarter of their NBA
Los Angeles Lakers' Kobe Bryant (24) tries to drive around Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson during the second quarter of their NBA basketball game at Oracle Arena, Monday, March 25, 2013, in Oakland, Calif. (D. Ross Cameron/Staff) ( D. ROSS CAMERON )

"I think I have the ability to do that, God forbid I don't get hurt or something," he said. "I've been very blessed."

"Unbelievable," said Jackson of Thompson's streak. "But Klay takes care of his body, he works his tail off, and he's tough. I think you have to be all of those things to have a streak like that."