OAKLAND -- In a game where neither team shot even 40 percent, Warriors coach Mark Jackson pointed to a player who scored just five points as "a game-changer."

Center Andrew Bogut, limited by first-half foul trouble, delivered the defense and rebounding Sunday that helped rally Golden State to a 97-87 overtime win over the San Antonio Spurs, knotting their Western Conference semifinal series at 2-2.

Bogut grabbed 18 rebounds, becoming the first Warriors player in 40 seasons to reach that total twice in the same postseason. He is the franchise's first player to corral double-digit rebounds in five straight playoff games in 24 years.

"He's a game-changer because of his presence in the paint and his high IQ for the game of basketball," Jackson said.

Bogut never has found his offensive rhythm this season while recovering from ankle surgery last spring.

"My primary role is to plug that paint up and grab all those rebounds and provide energy plays," he said. "That's kind of been what I've concentrated on in the playoffs."

The 7-footer from Melbourne, Australia, played just 5 minutes, 41 seconds in the first half before collecting his third personal foul -- and a technical -- and taking a seat on the bench.

"He's a great defender, he's a great rebounder, he's a great rim protector. We were missing him," Jackson said. "But he's played lights out, and he certainly has elevated his game in the postseason."

Bogut's role in helping the Warriors prevail in a game where there were few easy points was critical. Facing the specter of a 3-1 series hole heading to San Antonio, Bogut and his teammates utilized defense to win an ugly one.

"To win a game like this is an important step for us," Bogut said. "Good teams that have bad shooting nights sometimes still win games."

For the Warriors to win a playoff game of this nature, Bogut suggested, is "probably unheard of in Warriors basketball history."

Well, almost. Golden State hadn't won a playoff game while shooting under 40 percent since May 14, 1975, against Chicago on its way to winning the NBA title.

The Warriors converted just 38 percent against the Spurs.

Bogut contributed to the Spurs having a bad shooting night (35.5 percent). He played 28 minutes, and nearly all of it was matched one-on-one against Spurs star Tim Duncan.

"I know I'm not going to hold him scoreless," Bogut said. "I try to battle him and not let him get comfortable."

Duncan finished with 19 points and 15 rebounds but shot 7 for 22, and the Spurs were outscored by 23 points during the time he was on the floor. The Warriors were plus-17 with Bogut on the court.

"He really controlled the glass and did a great job on possibly the best power forward of all time in the post," teammate David Lee said. "He just keeps getting the job done."

  • Lee says it's likely he will undergo surgery after the season to repair a torn right hip flexor he sustained in Game 1 of the Denver playoff series.

    Lee played Sunday for the third time since suffering the injury, contributing five rebounds and a steal in two stints totaling 7:49 on the floor. It's the most he's played in those three outings, and the best he's felt.

    Going forward, he said, "the minutes will be up to Coach, but I felt noticeably better today than I did two days ago. I can't give you a reason why, but as long as I continue to feel good, I'm going to give what I have."

  • Andris Biedrins hadn't played in any of the previous nine playoff games and hadn't played in a game at all since April 12, but he contributed three pretty good minutes when Bogut, Carl Landry and Festus Ezeli got into foul trouble.

    Biedrins had two rebounds and also stood his ground for the most part against Duncan.

    "It's hard to go in and guard anybody if you haven't played for awhile," Biedrins said. "But I've played against him so many times, I kind of know all the stuff he does, so it made it a little easier."

  • Bogut is the first Golden State player to have 18 or more rebounds in two playoff games since Nate Thurmond and Clyde Lee both did it in 1973.

    Staff writer Carl Steward contributed to this report.