OAKLAND -- Baron Davis can recall the scene with vivid clarity: On a cold March night outside Detroit, the visitor's locker room at the Palace of Auburn Hills was crackling with energy.

The Warriors finally had their new team totally healthy, and the Detroit Pistons were made to witness the power of a fully operational Golden State roster, getting pasted by 18 points on their home floor.

"That was the first time we came to the game with a no-nonsense attitude," Davis said. "We were treating every game like it was the most important game of our lives. That's the mentality that we're going to have to adopt. Now."

It wasn't enough. Despite facing a depleted Pistons team on the second half of a road back-to-back, the Warriors watched a 22-point lead be transformed by a mix of poor shots and outright sloppiness into a 111-104 defeat Wednesday night that left them, at 0-6, the NBA's only winless team.

Davis had 29 points and 10 assists, but he couldn't keep the Warriors from sliding deeper into a hole of their own making. Detroit shot 53 percent from the floor, Golden State missed 17 of its last 21 3-pointers, and the Warriors thus dropped to 0-4 at home for the first time since 1998-99.

Tayshaun Prince, Rasheed Wallace and Richard Hamilton each tallied 22 points for Detroit, and Jason Maxiell had a 14-point, 14-rebound double-double to elicit booing from the remnants of an 18,293-strong crowd at Oracle Arena.

After watching their huge advantage shrink to just three points by the end of the third period, the Warriors seemed to have finally snapped the lid on tight when Davis flushed a two-hand jam, making it 94-84 with 8:52 left.

It was just the tease before the storm, however.

As the Pistons used their variety of zones to lure the Warriors into launching errant 3-pointers, they stormed back with 11 consecutive points. Six of those came from Wallace, who tore up Andris Biedrins, Al Harrington and all fourth-quarter double-teams with casual ease.

Wallace's 3-pointer at the 4:02 mark gave the Pistons a 101-97 lead. The Warriors got to within one point a couple of times, but misfired on their one shot to take the lead. Guard Kelenna Azubuike drove down the left baseline with 2 minutes to go, but he threw up an airball and got no help from the officials.

Prince answered with a hook shot to make it 105-102 with 1:46 left. Maxiell followed with two free throws and Prince hit another jumper for an insurmountable 109-102 advantage.

It was the first time the Warriors and Pistons had matched up since that fateful March 5 game, which kicked off Golden State's 16-5 run to close out the regular season.

"Hopefully, we'll recapture that magic," Harrington said.

Conditions couldn't have been any more magical from the hosts' perspective; Detroit, hardly a deep team to begin with, endured a bruising 102-94 defeat in Portland and had to make do without two starters: Point guard Chauncey Billups was nursing a sore left knee, and stretched shoulder ligaments prevented forward Antonio McDyess from lifting a ball above his head.

With Seattle and Minnesota polishing off their first victories of the season earlier Wednesday, the Warriors took the floor as the only winless team left in the NBA.

Golden State led 40-25 after one quarter, thanks to Davis' 16 points, and were cruising through the second period when rookie forward Brandan Wright ripped a tap-slam for his first NBA basket. That made the score 59-37, Warriors, with 3:48 remaining before halftime. The more optimistic portion of the crowd was probably looking forward to the NBA debut of rookie center Kosta Perovic.

But the Pistons sneaked up before intermission, and when Flip Murray capped a 14-5 run with an open trey at the 1.2-second mark, the Warriors' advantage was down to 64-51.

Contact Geoff Lepper at glepper@bayareanewsgroup.com.